Earth's Atmospheric Phenomena
From Sunsets to rainbows, NLC's to Aurora, even Meteor showers. Anything happening  in the atmosphere goes in this gallery

Click on the images to view gallery slideshow. Each slideshow has up tp 15 images, and can be played automatically or stopped and browsed an image at a time. using the buttons on the bottom left of the galleries
NLC by Ken Kennedy.  15th-16th June 2320UT. Canon EOS-100D, f/4.5.  8 seconds at ISO-200. Ken's first NLC of the season
Due to high temperature in the upper atmosphere Noctiluscent clouds have been in very short supply.  There have been very few reports but Ken managed to get two images in mid June.  Then on  the night of 1st-2nd July they returned with some magnificent displays.  The slideshow features two from ken of mid june followed by several from observers of the July display.
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Aurora by Pam Foster. 1st March 2017  23:49.  Canon EOS 600D, f/5   30 seconds  ISO-800.  “Was too busy watching the display when it was at its best, but this is my best image from last night!!
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Sundog by Andy Heenan 21.08.2016 - 17.31UT.  Canon EOS 600D f/5.6 - 1200 second. ISO-100 - 300mm focal length
Sun Pillar by Andy Heenan. A quick shot taken by phone at 20.49 Sunday 24th 1/120 second - ISO-150 exposure bias -1.7 step focal length 3mm
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Perseids By Ken Kennedy. 12.08.15  11.40pm. Canon EOS 100D f/4.  ISO-1500. 90 second exposure.
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2017 Noctilucent Clouds Season
Perdeid Meteor shower August 2015
By Andy Heenan. 1st February 2016.  Canon EOS 600D  f/4.5: 1/250 sec: ISO-100
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Polar stratospheric clouds or PSCs, also known as nacreous
clouds,  from nacre, or mother of pearl, due to its iridescence,
are clouds in the winter polar stratosphere at altitudes of
15,000-25,000 meters (49,000-82,000 ft). They are best
observed during civil twilight when the sun is between 1 and 6
degrees below the horizon as well as in winter and in more
northerly latitudes. They are implicated in the formation of
ozone holes. The effects on ozone depletion arise because
they support chemical reactions that produce active chlorine
which catalyzes ozone destruction, and also because they
remove gaseous nitric acid, perturbing nitrogen and chlorine
cycles in a way which increases ozone destruction.
Nacreous Clouds
By Ken Kennedy. Canon EOS 100D at 24mm focal length at f4 for 6 seconds, 200 ISO. "NLC display seen 17/18 July 2017 from 2316 - 0219 UT.  Low (8 degrees) towards the north (see image 0002 UT) showing type II & III forms."- Ken K
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